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18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Becoming Los Angeles, Los Angeles
United States, 2013
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
Product Table cases
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
18 various type display cases for a suite of 4 adjacent galleries in NHM's newly renovated buildings.
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Free-standing HAHN display cases with highly flexible dimmable lighting system and special motorized opening mechanism
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Rotunda, Los Angeles
United States, 2010
Free-standing HAHN display cases with highly flexible dimmable lighting system and special motorized opening mechanism
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
In 2010 the historic Rotunda of the Natural History Museum was re-opened after a four year renovation period. The hall is lined with 16 marble columns and crowned by a brilliantly coloured stained glass skylight, about 53 feet (16 m) high. Since the summer of 2010 it has become home to eight freestanding display cases manufactured by GLASBAU HAHN.
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
In 2010 the historic Rotunda of the Natural History Museum was re-opened after a four year renovation period. The hall is lined with 16 marble columns and crowned by a brilliantly coloured stained glass skylight, about 53 feet (16 m) high. Since the summer of 2010 it has become home to eight freestanding display cases manufactured by GLASBAU HAHN.
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
The cases offer maximal access to their interior by means of a special opening system: the glass panels move apart, thanks to motors in the base and light box, dividing the case into two parts. Equipped with LED spotlights fixed to the soffit and four removable LED light bars along the corners, each display case has a highly flexible, dimmable lighting system. Removable vertical panels divide the case interior into two sections, accommodating very small objects as well as large objects on one side, and their captions on the other. This perfectly serves the headline of the opening exhibit “What on Earth?” by presenting a rare object with a playful question to the viewer on one side, then giving the answer on the other side.
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
The cases offer maximal access to their interior by means of a special opening system: the glass panels move apart, thanks to motors in the base and light box, dividing the case into two parts. Equipped with LED spotlights fixed to the soffit and four removable LED light bars along the corners, each display case has a highly flexible, dimmable lighting system. Removable vertical panels divide the case interior into two sections, accommodating very small objects as well as large objects on one side, and their captions on the other. This perfectly serves the headline of the opening exhibit “What on Earth?” by presenting a rare object with a playful question to the viewer on one side, then giving the answer on the other side.
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
Since the summer of 2010 the restored rotunda has become home to eight freestanding display cases manufactured by GLASBAU HAHN.
Simon Adlam, the director of exhibition production and designer of the display cases, had specific demands on the frameless all-glass showcases: “I want(ed) 11 feet of hanging glass in earthquake country! It’s a major accomplishment.” He points out that “Angelenos want to be bathed in light”, even in a museum showing bones and fossils. Visitors want glamour, and they find it with these elegant architectural glass cases.
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
Since the summer of 2010 the restored rotunda has become home to eight freestanding display cases manufactured by GLASBAU HAHN.
Simon Adlam, the director of exhibition production and designer of the display cases, had specific demands on the frameless all-glass showcases: “I want(ed) 11 feet of hanging glass in earthquake country! It’s a major accomplishment.” He points out that “Angelenos want to be bathed in light”, even in a museum showing bones and fossils. Visitors want glamour, and they find it with these elegant architectural glass cases.
Photo: Tom Bonner, Los Angeles
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